New Year's Eve ritual

View previous topic View next topic Go down

New Year's Eve ritual

Post by Jonathan on 11.10.10 3:22

I had a question in mind. Do you think that Asetians celebrate in a special way, united in Family and with unique rituals, the passing of the year in December 31?

I was wondering since we all know Egyptians already used the 365 day solar calendar to map the full year. In fact, they created it, so probably the Asetians already used it back in the days of old Kemet. I also understand they have a deeper connection with the Moon and its phases than with the passing of the Sun, but as beings that commune with nature and are an essencial and pure part of it, they surely must be aligned and attuned with many other astrological events and natural occurrences.

I'm interested in reading other opinions about it.
avatar
Jonathan
Master
Master

Number of posts : 2220
Location : United States
Registration date : 2008-06-05

Back to top Go down

Re: New Year's Eve ritual

Post by Divine 277 on 11.10.10 5:08

Jonathan wrote:I had a question in mind. Do you think that Asetians celebrate in a special way, united in Family and with unique rituals, the passing of the year in December 31?

I was wondering since we all know Egyptians already used the 365 day solar calendar to map the full year. In fact, they created it, so probably the Asetians already used it back in the days of old Kemet. I also understand they have a deeper connection with the Moon and its phases than with the passing of the Sun, but as beings that commune with nature and are an essential and pure part of it, they surely must be aligned and attuned with many other astrological events and natural occurrences.

I'm interested in reading other opinions about it.

Actually this has also puzzled me a bit, since some years do have 13 Moons instead of 12 ..

So I did a bit of a investigation on the subject Smile
So this is what I found i different places for now ....



Egyptians : at an earlier date, with the intercalation of an extra month regulated either by the heliacal rising of Sothis or by the inundation of the fields by the Nile.[5] The first inundation according to the calendar was observed in Egypt's first capital, Memphis, at the same time as the heliacal rising of Sirius.
The heliacal rising of Sothis returned to the same point in the calendar every 1460 years (a period called the Sothic cycle). The difference between a seasonal year and a civil year was therefore 365 days in 1460 years, or one day in four years. Similarly, the Egyptians were aware that 309 lunations nearly equaled 9125 days, or 25 Egyptian years, which was later used in the construction of a secondary lunar calendar that did not depend on observations.[6
Egypt also had a separate calendar in the Old Kingdom period, with a 320-day year (as mentioned in the Palermo Stone).... instead of the tradisional 360 or 365 days we use to day


320: 320 -day year (as mentioned in the Palermo Stone )

360 : 360 day year (The Egyptian year was divided into three seasons (Inundation/Autmn, Growing/Winter and Harvest/Summer) Each season was divided into four months of each thirty days making a total of 120 days in each season) Like 120 degree angle of a circle is , 1 /3 part of a hole ....

365: days long and was divided into 12 months of 30 days each, plus five extra days (epagomenae, from Greek ἐπαγόμεναι) at the end of the year.


The Egyptians may have used a Luni-solar calendar.

luni-solar calendar:

Most lunar calendars are, in fact, lunisolar; such as the Chinese, Hebrew, and Hindu calendars, and most calendar systems used in antiquity.
All these calendars have a variable number of months in a year. The reason for this is that a year is not evenly divisible by an exact number of lunations, so without the addition of intercalary months the seasons would drift each year.

This results in a thirteen-month year every two or three years. ( or as we call it : blue moon.)
Some lunar calendars are calibrated by annual natural events which are affected by lunar cycles as well as the solar cycle. An example of this is the lunar calendar of the Banks Islands which includes three months in which the edible palolo worm mass on the beaches. These events occurs at the last quarter of the lunar month, as the reproductive cycle of the palolos is synchronised with the moon.[1]
Lunar calendars differ:

For some lunar calendars, such as the Chinese calendar, the first day of a month is the day when an astronomical new moon appears in a particular time zone. For others, such as some Hindu calendars, each month begins at full moon. Others were based in the past on the first sighting of a lunar crescent such as the Hebrew calendar.

Festival days :

New Year's Day/Feast of Wagy/January 17, Egypt way: New Year's Day in Egypt was known as Wep-renpet. The first celebration was the New Year's festival. for the ancient Egyptians. New Year's Day wasn't just the first day of the year, it was also the day rejuvenation and rebirth took place.
Seventeen days after New Year's Day there is the feast of Wagy
It soon became the connected to the festival of Thoth on the nineteenth day of the year. This celebration is from the 4th dynasty, making it one of the oldest festivals in ancient Egypt.
The Festival of Anket was to celebrate the rising of the Nile River. The Nile was very important the Egyptians; the river gave the ancient Egyptians many things. Thuthi is the festival of the dead and was celebrated at sunset. This festival was celebrated because the ancient Egyptians thought that the afterlife was really important.

The festival of Wagy was celebrated in honor of Osiris, on the 17th day of the first month of the year. On that date, funerary gifts were given to the dead. In ancient Egypt, the New Year was the day on which Sirius, the brightest star in the sky, rose together with the sun – known as a helical rising.
At least, that was the theory. In practice, the Egyptian calendar was not fixed (it did not take the quarter day into account), which meant that every four years, the New Year moved one day. It meant that the calendars realigned only every 1460 year (365 times 4).

In Ptolemaic times (3rd century BC), the Canopus Decree stated that the New Year and thus the calendar should become fixed. The New Year was fixed on July 20; Wagy was thus celebrated on August 8. If, however, as is now the custom, we anchor the New Year on January 1, then the feast is celebrated on January 17.



So Yes, I think they did Smile

Hope this wasnt to messy ... Razz

Sincerely Divine
avatar
Divine 277
Expert
Expert

Number of posts : 951
Age : 36
Location : Gate between heaven and hell.
Registration date : 2010-03-01

https://www.facebook.com/academyofancientknowlege/?fref=ts

Back to top Go down

Re: New Year's Eve ritual

Post by ms-n Taw on 11.10.10 8:48

Actually, the Ancient Egyptian New Year began when Sopdet, the Star Sirius, rose above the horizon - usually in mid-July. It signaled the flood was coming. The calendar consisted of three seasons: Akhet - The Flood Season, Peret - The Growing Season, and Shemu: The Harvest Season.

Each season had four months of 30 days.
Akhet: Thoth, Paophi, Athyr, Sholiak
Peret: Tyvi, Meshir, Phamenoeth, Pharmouthi
Shemu: Pashons, Payni, Epiphi, Mesori

"Now, Nut the sky goddess and Geb the god of the earth were considered passionate lovers, but were forbidden to join together as Nut was married to Ra, the sun god. During the day, the god of the air, Shu, separated Nut from Geb, but at night, Nut lay with Geb. Angered by this, Ra refused to let her bear her children on any day of the year as punishment. Desperate to bear her children, Nut went to Thoth, the scribe god and god of the moon, who stole light from the moon to create five new days to add to the end of the year. These days were not considered part of the calendar." - Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt.

The five non-days at the end of the Egyptian Year were use to celebrate the gods: Asar, Heru, Set, Aset, and Nephthys.
avatar
ms-n Taw
Beginner
Beginner

Number of posts : 5
Location : pn rk
Registration date : 2010-06-07

Back to top Go down

Re: New Year's Eve ritual

Post by Kalb on 11.10.10 17:14

It's interesting you talk about the calendar. There are rumors that in ancient Egypt 3,751 years ago, for example, the New Year's Day began when the star Sirius is Canopus aligned with their counterparts in the southern direction of the Milky Way, precisely at midnight upright on the pyramids of Giza, which would be 16 in July in Gregorian calendar. This is interesting because i have a point. The publication of the Asetian Bible was 7 July 2007, that means there is a difference of 9 days between the calendars. Makes me think that the day 7 July, 2007 is not just the number of Aset and Asetians, but a new stage, a new cycle of energy, a new year. I'm speculate.
Jonathan, I believe the Asetians celebrate the new year like us but in a very different way..
Asetians forever watching, evolving, adapting...
avatar
Kalb
Expert
Expert

Number of posts : 1253
Location : Some part of infinite universe...
Registration date : 2009-10-28

http://twitter.com/#!/st7lk3r

Back to top Go down

Re: New Year's Eve ritual

Post by ms-n Taw on 11.10.10 21:49

Stalker, you are correct about the Pyramids in Giza being aligned with Orion's belt of which Sirius is a part. They are also aligned with Egypt's Ley Line, or power center, that can be experienced anytime but can only be intensely felt when the power spikes at sunrise.

As far as the calendar in Pre-Dynastic Egypt goes, it was based on a lunar cycle with Sirius still marking the New Year. Sopdet (Sirius in Greek) was also another name for Aset. As the story goes: Aset slumbers for seventy days and when She awakens, She remembers the passing of Her dear Asar and weeps for him causing the Nile to overflow.

A statue of Aset used to stand at the original Temple of Philae. When the priests of the Temple noticed that Sopdet was no longer visible in the sky, they would take turns each night looking at Her statue. When Sopdet was aligned with the jewel in the crown of Her statue, She was awake and the New Year began.
avatar
ms-n Taw
Beginner
Beginner

Number of posts : 5
Location : pn rk
Registration date : 2010-06-07

Back to top Go down

Re: New Year's Eve ritual

Post by ms-n Taw on 11.10.10 22:29

I forgot to mention the 7/7/7 significance. Religion is like a tree with every religion have a branch and it's roots planted firmly in ancient Egypt.

Seven is a "lucky" number in all major religions. In ancient Egypt, the number seven was apparently the Egyptian symbol of such ideas as perfection, effectiveness, and completeness.

Seven thousand barrels of red beer were used to trick Sekhmet out of killing.
In her search for Asar's pieces, Aset was guarded by seven scorpions.
Set tore the god Asar’s body into fourteen pieces: seven each for the two regions of Upper and Lower Egypt.
The Pool symbol, representing water, contains seven zigzag lines.
The Gold symbol has seven spines on its underside.

So it would make sense to make their presence know on 7/7/7.
avatar
ms-n Taw
Beginner
Beginner

Number of posts : 5
Location : pn rk
Registration date : 2010-06-07

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum